Caregiving

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Spring cleaning is a common tradition because we are ready to shake off the dust - quite literally - and start a fresh new season.

At this time of year, it’s a good idea to take a fresh look at your parents living situation. Your aging parents will want their home cleaned for the spring too, but they may not be physically able to do everything they used to do. A common first sign that your parents are struggling to live on their own is a decrease in their ability to care for their living space and themselves.

Caring for Your Spouse

Caring for Your Spouse

Many caregiving resources, from books to podcasts and everything in between, are targeted toward adult children. Some of us might assume that all senior care is orchestrated by children, or at the very least by younger relatives, and this assumption isn't unfounded: almost half of all caregivers in the US are between 18 and 49 years of age. But according to an analysis conducted in 2015, 34% of caregivers are over 65 years old. This is not an insignificant portion of the caregiving population, and these caregivers, many of whom are the spouses of the persons receiving care, require different support than adult children caregivers do. 

This post offers advice for spouses who have found themselves, along with their partners, at the stage in life during which “in sickness and in health” has transitioned from being a promise to being their daily reality.

Top 10 Things to Do with Your Aging Parents in Boston

Top 10 Things to Do with Your Aging Parents in Boston

Boston is a city rich in history, culture, and natural beauty. Sources of entertainment are seemingly limitless in Boston, but seniors do often face limitations when it comes to being active and exploring, such as low stamina and difficulties with mobility. Despite this, however, there are numerous senior-friendly activities in the city which are suitable for both visitors and longtime residents. In this post, you'll find a list of activities that you can partake in with your senior parents, many of which are accessible. Find an activity that suits your parent's interests and enjoy a family outing in "Beantown." 

Live-In, Overnight, and Hourly Cases for Caregivers: What's the Difference?

Live-In, Overnight, and Hourly Cases for Caregivers: What's the Difference?

This post gives an overview of each of the four types of cases available at Mavencare. If you’re an applicant or a recently hired caregiver, this post should help you decide which cases are the best fit for you.

10 Summer Activities for Your Aging Parents

10 Summer Activities for Your Aging Parents

Summer is traditionally an active time: kids are off school and playing outside, families gather for reunions and barbecues, and people flock to the beach for swimming, volleyball, and sandcastle-building. Aging may cause some mobility issues and heat sensitivity, but with a few adjustments, there is no reason seniors shouldn't enjoy the active summer season. Indeed, participating in indoor or outdoor activities can be beneficial for your senior parent's physical and mental health. 

With summer upon us, here are some ideas for activities you can do with your aging parent, or that your parent might want to partake in on their own, with friends, or even with their caregiver. 

Sibling Communication in Senior Care

Sibling Communication in Senior Care

Caregiving requires a lot of communication. You’ll have to establish clear lines of communication with your parent who needs care, with their doctors and other medical professionals, and with their home care aides.

But you’ll also have to establish good communication with the rest of your family unit – most importantly, your siblings and siblings-in-law. In the midst of making sure that our parent’s caregiver and all of the medical professionals in their life are on the same page as we are, communication lines with siblings are the ones we often forget to leave open.

How to Care for a Difficult Elderly Parent

How to Care for a Difficult Elderly Parent

Nearly every culture expects filial responsibility. It’s such an ordinary expectation that it seems like common sense: parents raise their children, and when they’re elderly or infirm, their children take care of them, returning their love and support. 

But what happens to expectations of filial responsibility when children feel that they never received love and support from their parents, or that parental love and support had unfair conditions attached? What happens to those expectations when your relationship with your aging parent is difficult, uncomfortable, or painful? 

These are hard questions for children who have negative relationships with their parents. There are no easy answers, but as with all aspects of senior care, there are many possible options. 

Everything You Need to Know About Home Health Aides (HHAs)

Everything You Need to Know About Home Health Aides (HHAs)

Every profession uses their own terminology to identify particular roles. But it can be difficult to understand exactly what a title signifies if you are not a part of that environment, or it is not entrenched in popular culture. We have a general idea (although exaggerated) of what forensics involves because of the show CSI and its spinoffs. Home health care has yet to make the same splash. To remove much of that uncertainty, we are going to focus on one particular role in home care—the home health aide.