Senior Home Care

Happy Aging - Senior Mental Health Has Unique Challenges

Happy Aging - Senior Mental Health Has Unique Challenges

Senior mental health has its own unique challenges that many of us cannot yet recognize. It’s common for family members to confuse a senior loved one’s symptoms of apathy, depression and anxiety as symptoms of dementia rather than a mental health issue.

While there have been advances in mental health treatment over the last few decades, a stigma still exists around addressing it. Seniors may feel especially reluctant to bring up these issues as they may be dismissed or grouped with other physiological conditions and ignored. What’s worse is that mental health has an impact on physical health and vice versa. Left untreated, depression can cause further damage to a senior’s already declining health.

5 Ways to Be Proactive About Senior Care

5 Ways to Be Proactive About Senior Care

Organizing senior care is often a reactive process: your mother or father has a health event, a healthcare professional tells you that they can no longer be home alone, or that they will require certain care services, and you and your siblings scramble to find the best way to deal with this new reality, all while you’re likely still reeling from the realization that your parent is no longer your caregiver - instead, the time has come for you to take care of them. 

In this post, we offer some suggestions which will help you flip the search for senior care from a reactive process to a proactive one. By having frank and understanding conversations with your parents, preparing for the unpleasant scenarios you might prefer to avoid thinking about, and keeping your parents’ health and their own preferences in mind as you make decisions as a family, you can make the process of becoming your parent’s caregiver significantly less stressful. 

Why Seniors With Dementia Wander and What You Can Do About It

Why Seniors With Dementia Wander and What You Can Do About It

According to The Alzheimer’s Association, 6/10 people with Dementia will wander. Wandering is one of the least manageable and most emotionally draining behaviours that caregivers must address. You have a million tasks on your plate, and caring for an aging loved one is stressful enough without the worry that they will get lost when you look away. Even if a senior with dementia promises to you that they will not wander away, the sad reality is that they have no control over it. As the disease progresses, their memory and reasoning skills can be so affected that they become lost in familiar places and don’t think to ask for help.

Research has not been able to provide a definitive reason why people with dementia wander, and the main reasons could be related to the changes in their memory, but the tendency to wander is also linked to unmet needs and overstimulation.

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Spring cleaning is a common tradition because we are ready to shake off the dust - quite literally - and start a fresh new season.

At this time of year, it’s a good idea to take a fresh look at your parents living situation. Your aging parents will want their home cleaned for the spring too, but they may not be physically able to do everything they used to do. A common first sign that your parents are struggling to live on their own is a decrease in their ability to care for their living space and themselves.

A Senior's Guide to Staying Healthy in Winter

A Senior's Guide to Staying Healthy in Winter

Winter brings many pleasant things: the holiday season, picturesque snowfalls, and the ideal conditions for certain sports. However, it also brings many things that aren’t so pleasant, like frigid weather, slippery sidewalks, and the dreaded flu season. No one looks forward to these parts of winter, but for seniors, they can be particularly troublesome. This post offers tips to help seniors deal with the more challenging parts of the winter months while staying as healthy as possible during the chilliest part of the year. 

How to Care for a Difficult Elderly Parent

How to Care for a Difficult Elderly Parent

Nearly every culture expects filial responsibility. It’s such an ordinary expectation that it seems like common sense: parents raise their children, and when they’re elderly or infirm, their children take care of them, returning their love and support. 

But what happens to expectations of filial responsibility when children feel that they never received love and support from their parents, or that parental love and support had unfair conditions attached? What happens to those expectations when your relationship with your aging parent is difficult, uncomfortable, or painful? 

These are hard questions for children who have negative relationships with their parents. There are no easy answers, but as with all aspects of senior care, there are many possible options. 

Everything You Need to Know About Home Health Aides (HHAs)

Everything You Need to Know About Home Health Aides (HHAs)

Every profession uses their own terminology to identify particular roles. But it can be difficult to understand exactly what a title signifies if you are not a part of that environment, or it is not entrenched in popular culture. We have a general idea (although exaggerated) of what forensics involves because of the show CSI and its spinoffs. Home health care has yet to make the same splash. To remove much of that uncertainty, we are going to focus on one particular role in home care—the home health aide.

How to Bring the Christmas Spirit to Your Elderly Loved Ones

How to Bring the Christmas Spirit to Your Elderly Loved Ones

The Christmas season has long since been a tradition of surrounding yourself with those you care about most. Even during the coldest season of the year, being able to visit your loved ones brings warmth and comfort to family members. But as people age and their lives progress, it can be increasingly difficult to be able to bring family together to share those special moments. 

If your elderly loved one has trouble travelling for the holidays, there are still a number of ways that you can include them in your holiday plans to help ensure they feel connected and cared for during the cold winter.