Home Care Services

Happy Aging - Senior Mental Health Has Unique Challenges

Happy Aging - Senior Mental Health Has Unique Challenges

Senior mental health has its own unique challenges that many of us cannot yet recognize. It’s common for family members to confuse a senior loved one’s symptoms of apathy, depression and anxiety as symptoms of dementia rather than a mental health issue.

While there have been advances in mental health treatment over the last few decades, a stigma still exists around addressing it. Seniors may feel especially reluctant to bring up these issues as they may be dismissed or grouped with other physiological conditions and ignored. What’s worse is that mental health has an impact on physical health and vice versa. Left untreated, depression can cause further damage to a senior’s already declining health.

Why Seniors With Dementia Wander and What You Can Do About It

Why Seniors With Dementia Wander and What You Can Do About It

According to The Alzheimer’s Association, 6/10 people with Dementia will wander. Wandering is one of the least manageable and most emotionally draining behaviours that caregivers must address. You have a million tasks on your plate, and caring for an aging loved one is stressful enough without the worry that they will get lost when you look away. Even if a senior with dementia promises to you that they will not wander away, the sad reality is that they have no control over it. As the disease progresses, their memory and reasoning skills can be so affected that they become lost in familiar places and don’t think to ask for help.

Research has not been able to provide a definitive reason why people with dementia wander, and the main reasons could be related to the changes in their memory, but the tendency to wander is also linked to unmet needs and overstimulation.

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Spring cleaning is a common tradition because we are ready to shake off the dust - quite literally - and start a fresh new season.

At this time of year, it’s a good idea to take a fresh look at your parents living situation. Your aging parents will want their home cleaned for the spring too, but they may not be physically able to do everything they used to do. A common first sign that your parents are struggling to live on their own is a decrease in their ability to care for their living space and themselves.

Top 5 Ways to Relieve Anxiety in Seniors

Top 5 Ways to Relieve Anxiety in Seniors

According to an article published by Harvard Medical School, anxiety is “one of the most common types of mental illness affecting people ages 60 and older.” 

The Mental Health Commission of Canada estimates that by 2041, Canada’s senior population will have “the highest rate of mental illness” in the nation. If your senior loved is having anxious thoughts, they are certainly not alone, and if you’re looking for ways to help ease your loved one’s anxiety, you’re not alone, either. 

Live-In, Overnight, and Hourly Cases for Caregivers: What's the Difference?

Live-In, Overnight, and Hourly Cases for Caregivers: What's the Difference?

This post gives an overview of each of the four types of cases available at Mavencare. If you’re an applicant or a recently hired caregiver, this post should help you decide which cases are the best fit for you.

Everything You Need to Know About CDPAP

Everything You Need to Know About CDPAP

This post gives an overview of CDPAP, a Medicaid program available in the state of New York. This post covers CDPAP eligibility, how to become a CDPAP recipient, CDPAP caregiver qualifications, and the pros and cons of the program. Here, you'll find the facts you need to make informed decisions as a CDPAP consumer. 

The Role of Caregiving Through the Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

The Role of Caregiving Through the Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

This post has been designed to prepare you for the realities of Alzheimer’s disease. There are many commonalities that are important to understand, even though everyone does experience the disease in their own way and pace. 

A Caregiver’s Guide to Parkinson’s

A Caregiver’s Guide to Parkinson’s

Often times the most frustrating part of Parkinson’s is there is no universal method to alleviate symptoms, as each person will experience the disease differently and require a different change in lifestyle. As a caregiver, you have the advantage of being in regular contact with your Parkinson’s patient and you can use this relationship to better understand their specific needs and help them with working towards improving their quality of life.

There are a couple of specific areas that you can focus on to help someone with Parkinson’s.