Family Caregiving

Respite Care - What It Is and Why Family Caregivers Need It

Respite Care - What It Is and Why Family Caregivers Need It

Caring for a senior loved one is a rewarding, yet challenging task.

Aging seniors need a varying degree of care from companionship to assistance with all activities of daily living such as getting out of bed, getting dressed, using the washroom, and cooking meals.

If you have your own full-time job and other family responsibilities, adding in the role of caregiver for your senior loved one can cause you to burn out. Not because it’s a burden on you, simply because you only have so much energy to expend in any given day.

What it Means to Be a Care Lead

What it Means to Be a Care Lead

Some clients arrange their own basic care needs, while others require a care lead. When we discuss the topic of care lead, we are often referring to the member of the family that has been appointed to make medical or healthcare decisions. The formal term for this is referred to as a Medical Power of Attorney.

This person is appointed by the client for the purpose of making healthcare decisions, but only if the client is not able to make decisions for themselves.

Age-Related Functional Decline and What it Means for Your Senior Loved Ones

Age-Related Functional Decline and What it Means for Your Senior Loved Ones

As your senior loved one ages, you might begin to worry about their physical and mental health. You may notice that they struggle with simple tasks, or that their memory isn’t as sharp as it once was.

What you’re worrying about is a loss of their ability to care for themselves or be independent. Typically, these worries are brought on by deterioration in mobility and in ability to perform activities of daily living such as dressing, using the washroom, or taking a bath.

In this post we’ll cover more about functional decline, common types to recognize, what this means for your senior loved ones, and how to slow down or delay functional decline.

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Spring cleaning is a common tradition because we are ready to shake off the dust - quite literally - and start a fresh new season.

At this time of year, it’s a good idea to take a fresh look at your parents living situation. Your aging parents will want their home cleaned for the spring too, but they may not be physically able to do everything they used to do. A common first sign that your parents are struggling to live on their own is a decrease in their ability to care for their living space and themselves.

Finding Joy in Caregiving

Finding Joy in Caregiving

Finding joy while caregiving does not have to be an elusive emotion only experienced after ignoring how you really feel. You are going to be stressed in this role, especially in the beginning, but there is a positive outlook to keep in mind. 

7 Things to Consider before Sharing Your Own Home with Your Aging Parent

7 Things to Consider before Sharing Your Own Home with Your Aging Parent

Sharing your home with your aging parents can lead to very positive experiences. Such a merger can save a significant amount of money, while also providing your aging parent the comfort that you feel they are entitled to. But, as with all things, there are certain considerations that you should be aware of before move-in day. These key factors will be highlighted in this post.

9 Ways to Fight Caregiver Burnout by Getting Organized Today

9 Ways to Fight Caregiver Burnout by Getting Organized Today

As you loved one ages, certain things will change. They will probably need increased levels of care, assistance with mobility and potentially more medical support. It’s important to be honest with yourself about this and plan for increased time and costs.