Elder Care Planning

What is a Home Care Agency and How is Mavencare Different?

What is a Home Care Agency and How is Mavencare Different?

Ninety percent of seniors want to stay in their own homes as they age, often referred to as “aging in place” but the majority cannot accomplish this. Senior home care typically involves services performed in a senior’s home to help them when they are struggling to perform daily tasks, chronically ill, or recovering from surgery. They need reliable caregivers and/or nurses to assist them with activities of daily living to keep them healthy and safe at home.

What it Means to Be a Care Lead

What it Means to Be a Care Lead

Some clients arrange their own basic care needs, while others require a care lead. When we discuss the topic of care lead, we are often referring to the member of the family that has been appointed to make medical or healthcare decisions. The formal term for this is referred to as a Medical Power of Attorney.

This person is appointed by the client for the purpose of making healthcare decisions, but only if the client is not able to make decisions for themselves.

Age-Related Functional Decline and What it Means for Your Senior Loved Ones

Age-Related Functional Decline and What it Means for Your Senior Loved Ones

As your senior loved one ages, you might begin to worry about their physical and mental health. You may notice that they struggle with simple tasks, or that their memory isn’t as sharp as it once was.

What you’re worrying about is a loss of their ability to care for themselves or be independent. Typically, these worries are brought on by deterioration in mobility and in ability to perform activities of daily living such as dressing, using the washroom, or taking a bath.

In this post we’ll cover more about functional decline, common types to recognize, what this means for your senior loved ones, and how to slow down or delay functional decline.

5 Ways to Be Proactive About Senior Care

5 Ways to Be Proactive About Senior Care

Organizing senior care is often a reactive process: your mother or father has a health event, a healthcare professional tells you that they can no longer be home alone, or that they will require certain care services, and you and your siblings scramble to find the best way to deal with this new reality, all while you’re likely still reeling from the realization that your parent is no longer your caregiver - instead, the time has come for you to take care of them. 

In this post, we offer some suggestions which will help you flip the search for senior care from a reactive process to a proactive one. By having frank and understanding conversations with your parents, preparing for the unpleasant scenarios you might prefer to avoid thinking about, and keeping your parents’ health and their own preferences in mind as you make decisions as a family, you can make the process of becoming your parent’s caregiver significantly less stressful. 

Ready for Your Biggest Challenge? Elder Care Planning Will Change Your Life.

Ready for Your Biggest Challenge? Elder Care Planning Will Change Your Life.

You know your parents are getting older, but are you prepared to step into a decision-making role if a sudden health emergency were to happen?

Do you know where your parents keep important documents? What are your parents’ care preferences and do they have the money to pay for their care? Do you know what your parents’ thoughts are on end-of-life care or life support?

While these questions may seem daunting or too far away to consider, many aging parents haven’t thought about their future care needs, and a sudden health change could cause even more stress without a plan in place.

Creating a Will: Guidelines & Considerations

Creating a Will: Guidelines & Considerations

Writing a will is a crucial task that provides peace of mind for both you and your loved ones. Once you’ve created a will, you can rest assured that your family will be taken care of and that your assets will be managed appropriately after your passing. A will lets your family members know what your final wishes are, so they can find peace and closure in fulfilling those wishes. 
 
It isn’t necessarily easy to create a will, as we rarely want to consider our own mortality. But it’s important, both for you and your family, that you have a will. The process of creating a will is not overly complicated or expensive, and it is well worth the clarity and comfort it provides. 
 
This post highlights some of the important aspects of will creation. This guide should ensure that you don’t miss any key components when creating your will or helping a loved one create theirs. If you make sure that the will you write includes the following components, it will be legally valid and will stand up to any challenges. 

Everything You Need to Know About CDPAP

Everything You Need to Know About CDPAP

This post gives an overview of CDPAP, a Medicaid program available in the state of New York. This post covers CDPAP eligibility, how to become a CDPAP recipient, CDPAP caregiver qualifications, and the pros and cons of the program. Here, you'll find the facts you need to make informed decisions as a CDPAP consumer. 

Sibling Communication in Senior Care

Sibling Communication in Senior Care

Caregiving requires a lot of communication. You’ll have to establish clear lines of communication with your parent who needs care, with their doctors and other medical professionals, and with their home care aides.

But you’ll also have to establish good communication with the rest of your family unit – most importantly, your siblings and siblings-in-law. In the midst of making sure that our parent’s caregiver and all of the medical professionals in their life are on the same page as we are, communication lines with siblings are the ones we often forget to leave open.