Ready for Your Biggest Challenge? Elder Care Planning Will Change Your Life.

Ready for Your Biggest Challenge? Elder Care Planning Will Change Your Life.

You know your parents are getting older, but are you prepared to step into a decision-making role if a sudden health emergency were to happen?

Do you know where your parents keep important documents? What are your parents’ care preferences and do they have the money to pay for their care? Do you know what your parents’ thoughts are on end-of-life care or life support?

While these questions may seem daunting or too far away to consider, many aging parents haven’t thought about their future care needs, and a sudden health change could cause even more stress without a plan in place.

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Spring cleaning is a common tradition because we are ready to shake off the dust - quite literally - and start a fresh new season.

At this time of year, it’s a good idea to take a fresh look at your parents living situation. Your aging parents will want their home cleaned for the spring too, but they may not be physically able to do everything they used to do. A common first sign that your parents are struggling to live on their own is a decrease in their ability to care for their living space and themselves.

A Senior's Guide to Staying Healthy in Winter

A Senior's Guide to Staying Healthy in Winter

Winter brings many pleasant things: the holiday season, picturesque snowfalls, and the ideal conditions for certain sports. However, it also brings many things that aren’t so pleasant, like frigid weather, slippery sidewalks, and the dreaded flu season. No one looks forward to these parts of winter, but for seniors, they can be particularly troublesome. This post offers tips to help seniors deal with the more challenging parts of the winter months while staying as healthy as possible during the chilliest part of the year. 

Seniors and Pets: The Pros & Cons

Seniors and Pets: The Pros & Cons

Would your senior loved one benefit from having a pet? You may have heard the conventional wisdom, which has been circulating since the 1980s, that pet ownership is good for seniors’ cardiovascular health, or the more recent findings from a 2008 report by the Humane Society of Canada, which suggest that pet ownership offers numerous health benefits, including lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol. There are many other benefits associated with having a four-legged friend - physical, mental, and social - but there are also responsibilities and risks associated with pet ownership that not all seniors can manage.

This post will help you make an informed choice about whether or not your senior loved one should explore the option of getting a canine or feline companion

Caring for Your Spouse

Caring for Your Spouse

Many caregiving resources, from books to podcasts and everything in between, are targeted toward adult children. Some of us might assume that all senior care is orchestrated by children, or at the very least by younger relatives, and this assumption isn't unfounded: almost half of all caregivers in the US are between 18 and 49 years of age. But according to an analysis conducted in 2015, 34% of caregivers are over 65 years old. This is not an insignificant portion of the caregiving population, and these caregivers, many of whom are the spouses of the persons receiving care, require different support than adult children caregivers do. 

This post offers advice for spouses who have found themselves, along with their partners, at the stage in life during which “in sickness and in health” has transitioned from being a promise to being their daily reality.

Top 5 Ways to Relieve Anxiety in Seniors

Top 5 Ways to Relieve Anxiety in Seniors

According to an article published by Harvard Medical School, anxiety is “one of the most common types of mental illness affecting people ages 60 and older.” 

The Mental Health Commission of Canada estimates that by 2041, Canada’s senior population will have “the highest rate of mental illness” in the nation. If your senior loved is having anxious thoughts, they are certainly not alone, and if you’re looking for ways to help ease your loved one’s anxiety, you’re not alone, either. 

Top 10 Things to Do with Your Aging Parents in Boston

Top 10 Things to Do with Your Aging Parents in Boston

Boston is a city rich in history, culture, and natural beauty. Sources of entertainment are seemingly limitless in Boston, but seniors do often face limitations when it comes to being active and exploring, such as low stamina and difficulties with mobility. Despite this, however, there are numerous senior-friendly activities in the city which are suitable for both visitors and longtime residents. In this post, you'll find a list of activities that you can partake in with your senior parents, many of which are accessible. Find an activity that suits your parent's interests and enjoy a family outing in "Beantown." 

Top 5 Ways to Be Proactive About Senior Care

Top 5 Ways to Be Proactive About Senior Care

Organizing senior care is often a reactive process: your mother or father has a health event, a healthcare professional tells you that they can no longer be home alone, or that they will require certain care services, and you and your siblings scramble to find the best way to deal with this new reality, all while you’re likely still reeling from the realization that your parent is no longer your caregiver - instead, the time has come for you to take care of them. 

In this post, we offer some suggestions which will help you flip the search for senior care from a reactive process to a proactive one. By having frank and understanding conversations with your parents, preparing for the unpleasant scenarios you might prefer to avoid thinking about, and keeping your parents’ health and their own preferences in mind as you make decisions as a family, you can make the process of becoming your parent’s caregiver significantly less stressful.