Why Seniors With Dementia Wander and What You Can Do About It

Why Seniors With Dementia Wander and What You Can Do About It

According to The Alzheimer’s Association, 6/10 people with Dementia will wander. Wandering is one of the least manageable and most emotionally draining behaviours that caregivers must address. You have a million tasks on your plate, and caring for an aging loved one is stressful enough without the worry that they will get lost when you look away. Even if a senior with dementia promises to you that they will not wander away, the sad reality is that they have no control over it. As the disease progresses, their memory and reasoning skills can be so affected that they become lost in familiar places and don’t think to ask for help.

Research has not been able to provide a definitive reason why people with dementia wander, and the main reasons could be related to the changes in their memory, but the tendency to wander is also linked to unmet needs and overstimulation.

6 Lifestyle Elements Men Can Use to Improve Their Health and Quality of Life

6 Lifestyle Elements Men Can Use to Improve Their Health and Quality of Life

As a society, we have improved our health and well-being to live longer. However, on average, men are living shorter lives than women. The average life expectancy for men in the US is roughly 75 years, compared to over the age of 80 for women. This health gap is partially due to the difference in biology, however, other lifestyle factors play a role in the length and quality of men's lives.

Gardening: An Activity Anyone Can Do To Improve Their Health

Gardening: An Activity Anyone Can Do To Improve Their Health

Gardening is a great form of therapy and exercise that provides benefits like stress relief, improved mood, positive self-esteem, increased strength and mobility, better heart health, improved dexterity, and it even reduces the risk of developing dementia. With some modifications to tools, and an altered garden layout, seniors gardening into their golden years is possible.

Sundown Syndrome: What is "Sundowning" and How is it Managed?

Sundown Syndrome: What is "Sundowning" and How is it Managed?

You may have a loved one or know someone suffering from Alzheimer’s as there are 5.7 million Americans currently living with the disease. Alzheimer’s and other dementias have many unique challenges that can affect seniors in different ways such as sundowning. Sundowning is a symptom for people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias that has multiple causes and displays differently for each individual. Sundowning can be alarming for the seniors who experience it, and for their families and caregivers who witness it happening.

This post will introduce you to a series of potential strategies you can use to decrease the magnitude of these challenges, offering suggestions to manage the symptoms of sundown syndrome to lessen the sense of apprehension that each day's sunset might be bringing you.

Ready for Your Biggest Challenge? Elder Care Planning Will Change Your Life.

Ready for Your Biggest Challenge? Elder Care Planning Will Change Your Life.

You know your parents are getting older, but are you prepared to step into a decision-making role if a sudden health emergency were to happen?

Do you know where your parents keep important documents? What are your parents’ care preferences and do they have the money to pay for their care? Do you know what your parents’ thoughts are on end-of-life care or life support?

While these questions may seem daunting or too far away to consider, many aging parents haven’t thought about their future care needs, and a sudden health change could cause even more stress without a plan in place.

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Can Your Parents Spring Clean On Their Own?

Spring cleaning is a common tradition because we are ready to shake off the dust - quite literally - and start a fresh new season.

At this time of year, it’s a good idea to take a fresh look at your parents living situation. Your aging parents will want their home cleaned for the spring too, but they may not be physically able to do everything they used to do. A common first sign that your parents are struggling to live on their own is a decrease in their ability to care for their living space and themselves.

A Senior's Guide to Staying Healthy in Winter

A Senior's Guide to Staying Healthy in Winter

Winter brings many pleasant things: the holiday season, picturesque snowfalls, and the ideal conditions for certain sports. However, it also brings many things that aren’t so pleasant, like frigid weather, slippery sidewalks, and the dreaded flu season. No one looks forward to these parts of winter, but for seniors, they can be particularly troublesome. This post offers tips to help seniors deal with the more challenging parts of the winter months while staying as healthy as possible during the chilliest part of the year. 

Seniors and Pets: The Pros & Cons

Seniors and Pets: The Pros & Cons

Would your senior loved one benefit from having a pet? You may have heard the conventional wisdom, which has been circulating since the 1980s, that pet ownership is good for seniors’ cardiovascular health, or the more recent findings from a 2008 report by the Humane Society of Canada, which suggest that pet ownership offers numerous health benefits, including lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol. There are many other benefits associated with having a four-legged friend - physical, mental, and social - but there are also responsibilities and risks associated with pet ownership that not all seniors can manage.

This post will help you make an informed choice about whether or not your senior loved one should explore the option of getting a canine or feline companion